Music

The national curriculum for music aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • perform, listen to, review and evaluate music across a range of historical periods, genres, styles and traditions, including the works of the great composers and musicians
  • learn to sing and to use their voices, to create and compose music on their own and with others, have the opportunity to learn a musical instrument, use technology appropriately and have the opportunity to progress to the next level of musical excellence
  • understand and explore how music is created, produced and communicated, including through the inter
  • related dimensions: pitch, duration, dynamics, tempo, timbre, texture, structure and appropriate musical notations.

Key Stage 1 (Years 1 & 2)

Topics / themes covered in Year 1

Topics / themes covered in Year 2

Key skills / knowledge covered

Pupils should be taught to:

  • use their voices expressively and creatively by singing songs and speaking chants and rhymes
  • play tuned and untuned instruments musically
  • listen with concentration and understanding to a range of high-quality live and recorded music
  • experiment with, create, select and combine sounds using the inter-related dimensions of music.

Link to relevant National Curriculum document on DfE website OR pdf download

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/239037/PRIMARY_national_curriculum_-_Music.pdf

How parents can support their child and links to useful websites

  • Encourage your young performer
    • Have a positive attitude about your child’s ability. Note progress in learning notes, moving rhythmically, and speaking expressively. Give your child helpful feedback such as suggestions to make her voice louder so it can be heard by all and being aware of her posture when she is singing.
  • Encourage your child to learn an instrument
    • The recorder is a very common first instrument and by third grade many students in school music programs have them.
  • Have music at home
    • Have a variety of music to play that is accessible to your child and properly stored. Have a drum, tambourine, and other rhythm instruments available. Kids can also make instruments to play along with music, create their own “soundscapes” or “orchestrate” a story. 
  • Try books, videos, and DVDs about music
    • Beethoven Lives Upstairs, a DVD movie, has more than two dozen musical excerpts.
  • Create a place for dance and drama
    • For dance, have a clear space for your child to move in. For drama, dress-ups inspire playmaking and dialogue.

Lower Key Stage 2 (Years 3 & 4)

Topics / themes covered in Year 3

Topics / themes covered in Year 4

Key skills / knowledge covered

Pupils should be taught to:

  • play and perform in solo and ensemble contexts, using their voices and playing musical instruments with increasing accuracy, fluency, control and expression
  • improvise and compose music for a range of purposes using the inter-related dimensions of music
  • listen with attention to detail and recall sounds with increasing aural memory
  • use and understand staff and other musical notations
  • appreciate and understand a wide range of high-quality live and recorded music drawn from different traditions and from great composers and musicians § develop an understanding of the history of music.

Link to relevant National Curriculum document on DfE website OR pdf download

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/239037/PRIMARY_national_curriculum_-_Music.pdf

How parents can support their child and links to useful websites

  • Encourage your young performer
    • Have a positive attitude about your child’s ability. Note progress in learning notes, moving rhythmically, and speaking expressively. Give your child helpful feedback such as suggestions to make her voice louder so it can be heard by all and being aware of her posture when she is singing.
  • Encourage your child to learn an instrument
    • The recorder is a very common first instrument and by third grade many students in school music programs have them.
  • Have music at home
    • Have a variety of music to play that is accessible to your child and properly stored. Have a drum, tambourine, and other rhythm instruments available. Kids can also make instruments to play along with music, create their own “soundscapes” or “orchestrate” a story. 
  • Try books, videos, and DVDs about music
    • Beethoven Lives Upstairs, a DVD movie, has more than two dozen musical excerpts.
  • Create a place for dance and drama
    • For dance, have a clear space for your child to move in. For drama, dress-ups inspire playmaking and dialogue.

Upper Key Stage 2 (Years 5 & 6)

Topics / themes covered in Year 5

Topics / themes covered in Year 6

Key skills / knowledge covered

Pupils should be taught to:

  • play and perform in solo and ensemble contexts, using their voices and playing musical instruments with increasing accuracy, fluency, control and expression
  • improvise and compose music for a range of purposes using the inter-related dimensions of music
  • listen with attention to detail and recall sounds with increasing aural memory
  • use and understand staff and other musical notations
  • appreciate and understand a wide range of high-quality live and recorded music drawn from different traditions and from great composers and musicians
  • develop an understanding of the history of music.

Link to relevant National Curriculum document on DfE website OR pdf download

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/239037/PRIMARY_national_curriculum_-_Music.pdf

How parents can support their child and links to useful websites

  • Encourage your young performer
    • Have a positive attitude about your child’s ability. Note progress in learning notes, moving rhythmically, and speaking expressively. Give your child helpful feedback such as suggestions to make her voice louder so it can be heard by all and being aware of her posture when she is singing.
  • Encourage your child to learn an instrument
    • The recorder is a very common first instrument and by third grade many students in school music programs have them.
  • Have music at home
    • Have a variety of music to play that is accessible to your child and properly stored. Have a drum, tambourine, and other rhythm instruments available. Kids can also make instruments to play along with music, create their own “soundscapes” or “orchestrate” a story. 
  • Try books, videos, and DVDs about music
    • Beethoven Lives Upstairs, a DVD movie, has more than two dozen musical excerpts.
  • Create a place for dance and drama
    • For dance, have a clear space for your child to move in. For drama, dress-ups inspire playmaking and dialogue.