Creative Curriculum
Art & Design / Music

The national curriculum for art and design aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • produce creative work, exploring their ideas and recording their experiences
  • become proficient in drawing, painting, sculpture and other art, craft and design techniques
  • evaluate and analyse creative works using the language of art, craft and design
  • know about great artists, craft makers and designers, and understand the historical and cultural
  • development of their art forms.

Key Stage 1 (Years 1 & 2)

Topics / themes covered in Year 1

Topics / themes covered in Year 2

Key skills / knowledge covered

Pupils should be taught:

  • to use a range of materials creatively to design and make products
  • to use drawing, painting and sculpture to develop and share their ideas, experiences and imagination
  • to develop a wide range of art and design techniques in using colour, pattern, texture, line, shape, form and space
  • about the work of a range of artists, craft makers and designers, describing the differences and similarities between different practices and disciplines, and making links to their own work.

Link to relevant National Curriculum document on DfE website OR pdf download

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/239018/PRIMARY_national_curriculum_-_Art_and_design.pdf

How parents can support their child and links to useful websites

  • Visit Art Museums
    • Take your child to a museum or gallery to look at artwork. Take the time to pause and look at the art and ask questions. For example ask “What do you see?” “What colors, lines and shapes do you see?” “What is happening?” “What do you think this picture is about?” “Why?” Accept her interpretation. Don’t tell him he is “wrong.” Artwork can have different meanings and there is no “right” answer.

Here is a list of galleries in London you can visit:

  • The National Gallery
  • Guildhall Art Gallery
  • UCL Art Museum
  • Tate Britain
  • Fashion and Textile Museum
  • Talk about art
    • When your child creates art, ask her to tell you about it and what she was trying to express, rather than asking, “What is this?” Discuss with her what techniques she used — did she use asymmetrical balance?
  • Display your child’s art work
    • When your child makes a special piece of art, it deserves to be displayed nicely. How about moving beyond refrigerator magnets to mounting artwork with a simple poster board fame, or buying frames from discount stores or Web sources. Mounting the artwork on a larger piece of construction paper and laminating is also a good way to protect and display. Another display idea is to have an “art wire” and hang the art with clips. 
  • Read books about art
    • There are a number of books about artists that will delight your child. Three examples are: Linnea in Monet’s Gardenby Cristina Bjork, Story Painter: The Life of Jacob Lawrence by John Duggleby and Talking to Faith Ringgold by Faith Ringgold, Linda Freeman and Nancy Roucher.

Lower Key Stage 2 (Years 3 & 4)

Topics / themes covered in Year 3

Topics / themes covered in Year 4

Key skills / knowledge covered

Pupils should be taught to develop their techniques, including their control and their use of materials, with creativity, experimentation and an increasing awareness of different kinds of art, craft and design.

Pupils should be taught:

  • to create sketch books to record their observations and use them to review and revisit ideas
  • to improve their mastery of art and design techniques, including drawing, painting and sculpture with a range of materials [for example, pencil, charcoal, paint, clay]
  • about great artists, architects and designers in history.

Link to relevant National Curriculum document on DfE website OR pdf download

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/239018/PRIMARY_national_curriculum_-_Art_and_design.pdf

How parents can support their child and links to useful websites

  • Visit Art Museums
    • Take your child to a museum or gallery to look at artwork. Take the time to pause and look at the art and ask questions. For example ask “What do you see?” “What colors, lines and shapes do you see?” “What is happening?” “What do you think this picture is about?” “Why?” Accept her interpretation. Don’t tell him he is “wrong.” Artwork can have different meanings and there is no “right” answer.

Here is a list of galleries in London you can visit:

  • The National Gallery
  • Guildhall Art Gallery
  • UCL Art Museum
  • Tate Britain
  • Fashion and Textile Museum
  • Talk about art
    • When your child creates art, ask her to tell you about it and what she was trying to express, rather than asking, “What is this?” Discuss with her what techniques she used — did she use asymmetrical balance?
  • Display your child’s art work
    • When your child makes a special piece of art, it deserves to be displayed nicely. How about moving beyond refrigerator magnets to mounting artwork with a simple poster board fame, or buying frames from discount stores or Web sources. Mounting the artwork on a larger piece of construction paper and laminating is also a good way to protect and display. Another display idea is to have an “art wire” and hang the art with clips. 
  • Read books about art
    • There are a number of books about artists that will delight your child. Three examples are: Linnea in Monet’s Gardenby Cristina Bjork, Story Painter: The Life of Jacob Lawrence by John Duggleby and Talking to Faith Ringgold by Faith Ringgold, Linda Freeman and Nancy Roucher.
    •  

Upper Key Stage 2 (Years 5 & 6) 

Topics / themes covered in Year 5

Topics / themes covered in Year 6

Key skills / knowledge covered

Pupils should be taught to develop their techniques, including their control and their use of materials, with creativity, experimentation and an increasing awareness of different kinds of art, craft and design.

Pupils should be taught:

  • to create sketch books to record their observations and use them to review and revisit ideas
  • to improve their mastery of art and design techniques, including drawing, painting and sculpture with a range of materials [for example, pencil, charcoal, paint, clay]
  • about great artists, architects and designers in history.

Link to relevant National Curriculum document on DfE website OR pdf download

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/239018/PRIMARY_national_curriculum_-_Art_and_design.pdf

How parents can support their child and links to useful websites

  • Visit Art Museums
    • Take your child to a museum or gallery to look at artwork. Take the time to pause and look at the art and ask questions. For example ask “What do you see?” “What colors, lines and shapes do you see?” “What is happening?” “What do you think this picture is about?” “Why?” Accept her interpretation. Don’t tell him he is “wrong.” Artwork can have different meanings and there is no “right” answer.

Here is a list of galleries in London you can visit:

  • The National Gallery
  • Guildhall Art Gallery
  • UCL Art Museum
  • Tate Britain
  • Fashion and Textile Museum
  • Talk about art
    • When your child creates art, ask her to tell you about it and what she was trying to express, rather than asking, “What is this?” Discuss with her what techniques she used — did she use asymmetrical balance?
  • Display your child’s art work
    • When your child makes a special piece of art, it deserves to be displayed nicely. How about moving beyond refrigerator magnets to mounting artwork with a simple poster board fame, or buying frames from discount stores or Web sources. Mounting the artwork on a larger piece of construction paper and laminating is also a good way to protect and display. Another display idea is to have an “art wire” and hang the art with clips. 
  • Read books about art
    • There are a number of books about artists that will delight your child. Three examples are: Linnea in Monet’s Gardenby Cristina Bjork, Story Painter: The Life of Jacob Lawrence by John Duggleby and Talking to Faith Ringgold by Faith Ringgold, Linda Freeman and Nancy Roucher. 

The national curriculum for music aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • perform, listen to, review and evaluate music across a range of historical periods, genres, styles and traditions, including the works of the great composers and musicians
  • learn to sing and to use their voices, to create and compose music on their own and with others, have the opportunity to learn a musical instrument, use technology appropriately and have the opportunity to progress to the next level of musical excellence
  • understand and explore how music is created, produced and communicated, including through the inter
  • related dimensions: pitch, duration, dynamics, tempo, timbre, texture, structure and appropriate musical notations.

Key Stage 1 (Years 1 & 2)

Topics / themes covered in Year 1

Topics / themes covered in Year 2

Key skills / knowledge covered

Pupils should be taught to:

  • use their voices expressively and creatively by singing songs and speaking chants and rhymes
  • play tuned and untuned instruments musically
  • listen with concentration and understanding to a range of high-quality live and recorded music
  • experiment with, create, select and combine sounds using the inter-related dimensions of music.

Link to relevant National Curriculum document on DfE website OR pdf download

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/239037/PRIMARY_national_curriculum_-_Music.pdf

How parents can support their child and links to useful websites

  • Encourage your young performer
    • Have a positive attitude about your child’s ability. Note progress in learning notes, moving rhythmically, and speaking expressively. Give your child helpful feedback such as suggestions to make her voice louder so it can be heard by all and being aware of her posture when she is singing.
  • Encourage your child to learn an instrument
    • The recorder is a very common first instrument and by third grade many students in school music programs have them.
  • Have music at home
    • Have a variety of music to play that is accessible to your child and properly stored. Have a drum, tambourine, and other rhythm instruments available. Kids can also make instruments to play along with music, create their own “soundscapes” or “orchestrate” a story. 
  • Try books, videos, and DVDs about music
    • Beethoven Lives Upstairs, a DVD movie, has more than two dozen musical excerpts.
  • Create a place for dance and drama
    • For dance, have a clear space for your child to move in. For drama, dress-ups inspire playmaking and dialogue.

Lower Key Stage 2 (Years 3 & 4)

Topics / themes covered in Year 3

Topics / themes covered in Year 4

Key skills / knowledge covered

Pupils should be taught to:

  • play and perform in solo and ensemble contexts, using their voices and playing musical instruments with increasing accuracy, fluency, control and expression
  • improvise and compose music for a range of purposes using the inter-related dimensions of music
  • listen with attention to detail and recall sounds with increasing aural memory
  • use and understand staff and other musical notations
  • appreciate and understand a wide range of high-quality live and recorded music drawn from different traditions and from great composers and musicians § develop an understanding of the history of music.

Link to relevant National Curriculum document on DfE website OR pdf download

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/239037/PRIMARY_national_curriculum_-_Music.pdf

How parents can support their child and links to useful websites

  • Encourage your young performer
    • Have a positive attitude about your child’s ability. Note progress in learning notes, moving rhythmically, and speaking expressively. Give your child helpful feedback such as suggestions to make her voice louder so it can be heard by all and being aware of her posture when she is singing.
  • Encourage your child to learn an instrument
    • The recorder is a very common first instrument and by third grade many students in school music programs have them.
  • Have music at home
    • Have a variety of music to play that is accessible to your child and properly stored. Have a drum, tambourine, and other rhythm instruments available. Kids can also make instruments to play along with music, create their own “soundscapes” or “orchestrate” a story. 
  • Try books, videos, and DVDs about music
    • Beethoven Lives Upstairs, a DVD movie, has more than two dozen musical excerpts.
  • Create a place for dance and drama
    • For dance, have a clear space for your child to move in. For drama, dress-ups inspire playmaking and dialogue.

Upper Key Stage 2 (Years 5 & 6)

Topics / themes covered in Year 5

Topics / themes covered in Year 6

Key skills / knowledge covered

Pupils should be taught to:

  • play and perform in solo and ensemble contexts, using their voices and playing musical instruments with increasing accuracy, fluency, control and expression
  • improvise and compose music for a range of purposes using the inter-related dimensions of music
  • listen with attention to detail and recall sounds with increasing aural memory
  • use and understand staff and other musical notations
  • appreciate and understand a wide range of high-quality live and recorded music drawn from different traditions and from great composers and musicians
  • develop an understanding of the history of music.

Link to relevant National Curriculum document on DfE website OR pdf download

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/239037/PRIMARY_national_curriculum_-_Music.pdf

How parents can support their child and links to useful websites

  • Encourage your young performer
    • Have a positive attitude about your child’s ability. Note progress in learning notes, moving rhythmically, and speaking expressively. Give your child helpful feedback such as suggestions to make her voice louder so it can be heard by all and being aware of her posture when she is singing.
  • Encourage your child to learn an instrument
    • The recorder is a very common first instrument and by third grade many students in school music programs have them.
  • Have music at home
    • Have a variety of music to play that is accessible to your child and properly stored. Have a drum, tambourine, and other rhythm instruments available. Kids can also make instruments to play along with music, create their own “soundscapes” or “orchestrate” a story. 
  • Try books, videos, and DVDs about music
    • Beethoven Lives Upstairs, a DVD movie, has more than two dozen musical excerpts.
  • Create a place for dance and drama
    • For dance, have a clear space for your child to move in. For drama, dress-ups inspire playmaking and dialogue.